Oranges on Golden Mountain by Elizabeth Partridge
http://www.elizabethpartridge.com/content/2_books/2B_childrens/2B_4_oranges_description.html

BOOK This picture book is the story of Jo Lee whose mother sends him to California with orange tree cuttings. The book makes reference to traditional Chinese folk religion and other cultural information about these immigrants from the east. Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers, 2001. K-5

Chinese New Year
http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/awr09.socst.world.glob.chinesenyr/

WEB VIDEO & DISCUSSION GUIDE This video from Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly shows a Buddhist family in the U.S. observing the rituals of Chinese New Year. The Chinese tradition of celebrating the New Year began more than 4,000 years ago, and has evolved into a holiday that includes a combination of rituals from Buddhism, Daoism and Confucianism. Also known as Spring Festival, it is celebrated by Chinese communities throughout the world at the end of winter.

Taoism
http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/taoism/

WEB RESOURCE This British Broadcast Company website focuses on Taoism. Sometimes seen as Daoism, this is an ancient tradition of philosophy and religious belief that is deeply rooted in Chinese customs and worldview. Taoist ideas have become popular throughout the world through Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong, and various martial arts.

Introduction to Daoism
http://www.edepot.com/taointro.html

WEB RESOURCE This outline and summary of Taoism is a recommended site by several religious studies scholars. It is well organized.

Taoism: Basic Concepts and History
http://taoism.about.com/od/basicprinciples/u/The_Tao.htm

WEB RESOURCE About.com provides a what they call a guided tour through Taoism's basic concepts - yin & yang, qi (chi), inner alchemy, the three treasures and much more. Then it looks at its long history, originating in the shamanic cultures of ancient China, winding through the various dynasties, and ending in contemporary forms world-wide. Lastly it looks at how Taoism is related to poetry, gender, science, Christianity & Buddhism.

Chinese Religion
http://religionfacts.com/chinese_religion/index.htm

WEB RESOURCE Chinese traditional religion is not an organized, unified system of beliefs and practices. It has no leadership, headquarters, founder, or denominations. Instead, traditional Chinese religion describes in interaction of different religious and philosophical traditions that have been influential in China. Chinese religion is composed of four main traditions: Chinese folk religion, Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism. The religious outlook of most Chinese people consists of some combination of beliefs and practices from these four traditions. This ReligionFacts sites provides descriptions of various aspects of traditional Chinese belief.

Legalism
http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/g/j/gjs4/textbooks/PM-China/ch5.htm

WEB RESOURCE This section of an online textbook produced by Penn State's East Asia program faculty provides a clear explanation of early Chinese Legalism. For information about other traditional Chinese beliefs or later time periods for Legalism, select textbook homepage.

Chinese Calendar, The by Lisa de Mauro
http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=sr_adv_b/?search-alias=stripbooks&unfiltered=1&field-keywords=&field-author=de+Mauro&field-title=Chinese+calendar&field-isbn=&field-publisher=&node=&field-p_n_condition-type=&field-feature_browse-bin=&field-subject=&field-language=&field-dateop=During&field-datemod=&field-dateyear=&sort=relevanceexprank&Adv-Srch-Books-Submit.x=0&Adv-Srch-Books-Submit.y=0

BOOK This brief book written for sixth graders traces the historical and cultural roots of the Chinese lunar calendar. Each year is named for one of twelve animals.

Religion Library: Taoism
http://www.patheos.com/Library/Taoism.html

WEB RESOURCE Taoism, also known as Daoism, is an indigenous Chinese religion often associated with the Daode jing (Tao Te Ching), a philosophical and political text purportedly written by Laozi (Lao Tzu) sometime in the 3rd or 4th centuries B.C.E. The Daode jing focuses on dao as a "way" or "path" ?? that is, the appropriate way to behave and to lead others. The Patheos Religion Library provides information about the origins, beliefs, history, rituals, and ethics of Taoism.

Mooncakes and Hungry Ghosts: Festivals of China by Carol Stepanchuk and Charles C. Wong

BOOK This is an overview of Chinese festivals as they are celebrated around the world. The book describes the historical roots of the festivals and the beliefs, and elements associated associated with the festivals. MS-HS

Chinese Religion
http://www.patheos.com/Library/Chinese-Religion.html

WEB RESOURCE This Patheos Library site argues that there are three major Eastern religions in China: Taoism, Buddhism, and Confucianism; but that religion in China predates these traditions and continues to exist outside their boundaries. Included is an introduction from which readers may link to origins, beliefs, history, rituals and worship, and ethics and community.

Living in the Chinese Cosmos: Understanding Religion in Late-Imperial China
http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/cosmos/index.html

WEB RESOURCE This Asia for Educators site is very valuable in helping Western students understand how religion is understood differently in China and the rest of Asia. This set of resources discuss the Chinese Cosmos, understanding religion in context, 19th c. European encroachment, 20th c.- communism and internal challenges,and religion in China today tradition and the question of identity.